What is teen dating violence


02-Apr-2020 01:14

Though most frequently the perpetrator of abuse is a male partner against a female partner, abuse by a female partner against a male also takes place.

Examples of stalking include repeated, uninvited visits to someone’s home, unwanted surveillance, consistent electronic communication, etc.

Additionally, Strauss notes that even relatively minor acts of physical aggression by women are a serious concern: 'Minor' assaults perpetrated by women are also a major problem, even when they do not result in injury, because they put women in danger of much more severe retaliation by men.

[...] It will be argued that in order to end 'wife beating,' it is essential for women also to end what many regard as a 'harmless' pattern of slapping, kicking, or throwing something at a male partner who persists in some outrageous behavior and 'won't listen to reason.' reports that a 13-year longitudinal study found that a woman's aggression towards a man was equally important as the man's tendency towards violence in predicting the likelihood of overall violence: "Since much IPV [Intimate Partner Violence] is mutual and women as well as men initiate IPV, prevention and treatment approaches should attempt to reduce women's violence as well as men's violence.

Additionally, data from the National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence (Nat SCEV) conducted in 2008 found that girls seemed to be more afraid of teen dating violence victimization compared to other types of victimization than boys; in a list of 43 types of victimization, girls ranked teen dating violence 13th while boys ranked it 42nd.

Recent research has also found a relationship between intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion.

The Center for Relationship Abuse Awareness describes dating abuse as a "pattern of abusive and coercive behaviors used to maintain power and control over a former or current intimate partner." Individuals of all walks of life can find themselves in an abusive relationship.